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Kudos to our Volunteers!

Dove is blessed to have many Volunteers join us in our programs and the work we do.  We would like to take a moment to highlight a few of our amazing volunteers within the Domestic Violence Program, and some of the milestones that were reached in November, 2018.
 

Lesley Dowell (R) is a dedicated volunteer who is always around when we need her. She has recently dedicated herself to assisting with the legal advocates, be it helping with Orders of Protection or attending court hearings with our survivors to help support and advocate for them. Lesley also is a volunteer who doesn’t hesitate to help cover the shelter when needed. It is my pleasure to share that Lesley has reached her second milestone and surpassed 100 hours of volunteer service within our program. Thanks Lesley for all you do!




Janet Broderick, (L), is one of our hardest working volunteers as well. Janet has filled a number of amazing roles, using her extensive backgrounds and trainings to make an impact in our program. She has helped with creating better tools to assist during crisis intervention with survivors who disclose suicidal or self-harm struggles. She has helped with shelter coverage and children’s services on numerous occasions. Janet focuses her talents heavily on assisting with legal advocacy, as well as using her specialized training and licensing to offer volunteer therapy sessions to victims of domestic violence. Needless to say, there are some services that literally wouldn’t happen if not for Janet’s volunteering. It is my pleasure to share that Janet has reached her first milestone and surpassed 50 hours of volunteer service within our program. Thanks Janet for all you do!


Jared Bohland, Client Services Coordinator



Janet and Leslie from the 2017 Candlelighting Ceremony where they were recognized for the contributions to the Domestic Violence Program

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